The Next Thing to Try: Calendar and Coffee

I got some good advice from Patrick Rhone I’m gonna try: using my calendar to stack habits.

The basic idea is: have a regular scheduled appointment to do a thing I like. Say, have coffee at a nearby place every Friday at noon.

After a few weeks that becomes “something I do”—I expect to do it, plan for it. Then, add another appointment afterwards to write for an hour, say.

In time, that chains the habit of writing to the habit of getting out of the house and getting a coffee, the latter of which I do not have a strong resistance to doing.

I already do the café thing pretty regularly, anyway… this way, I’m making it part of my system for getting work done.

Worth a shot! Let’s see how it goes.

Tim Grahl on Book Marketing in Three Steps

I like Tim Grahl’s stuff. He was introduced to me by my boss, Sean McCabe, and I saw him speak (and scored a copy of his book, Running Down a Dream) at Craft + Commerce this past summer. Tim’s got a blog post I’ve had bookmarked for a while, and I’d rather bookmark it here, for the benefit of you and me, than just keep one more browser tab eternally open on my desktop…

A Simple Marketing Plan for Fiction Authors – Book Launch

I’ll just spoil the ending:

BOOK MARKETING IS NOT COMPLICATED OR TIME-CONSUMING

The most common reasons people avoid making progress with their marketing is because a) they don’t know what to do and b) they are afraid it will take too long.

Follow this simple plan to get started and you’ll see it make a difference.

Good stuff. While one could argue that thinking about book marketing when I’m still mostly avoiding working on my draft is just one more distraction… I’ll come back to this when the time is right.

If It Were Easy

It’s been a while… as usual.

I’ve started working on my novel again, in fits and starts. I determined, with my coach, that my deadline for being done the draft should be March 31, with May 31 as a backstop. (In other words, I’ll aim for the nearer deadline, but be content if it takes me ’til the later one.)

I agreed to set aside two one-hour blocks a day, five days a week, to work on the project. I haven’t exactly done that. But I have worked on it for a couple of hours in the past week… which is more than in the previous months.

So be it.

I have a stack of index cards I made when I first planned out the book, and I’m adding to them: there are scenes in there that don’t fit the story anymore, or never made it into the draft in the first place. And now I’m revamping a lot of the last half of the book, introducing a different antagonist, etc. It feels good, but it still feels like the project is on the periphery of my awareness, like, I try to remember to work on it, ever.

I had an idea recently, that it’s not just you either build a habit of writing every day, or nothing. It’s worse:

If you’re not building a habit of writing every day, you’re building a habit of NOT WRITING. Which is going to make it fucking hard to get a novel done, believe me.

Yikes.

Sounds dreadful, right? But there’s another side to it: this question that Tim Ferriss has mentioned asking himself:

What would this look like if it were easy?

Fact is, it’s not real hard to put a little time into the book every day, even if it’s just a few minutes. Just one card, just one scene. It’s when the whole project turns into this big ball of feeling bad about yourself that it seems impossible. It’s not impossible, it isn’t even a big deal.

Even writing regular posts for this blog: what would it look like if it were easy? I got the idea for what I’m writing right now whilst washing dishes, and why not just sit down and type it out, half-formed, edit it… it’s fine. It’s something. It’s a record that I exist, instead of no such record. If I write a book, if I write a hundred books, that’s all they’ll be. I’m not out to change the world, just have something other than my eventual epitaph that says, “Hi. I was here.”

I’m not sure this is a very good post. Know what? I’m publishing it anyway. The way to get better is to just write a thing and then write another thing… Whenever I think too hard about what I’m doing, I just don’t do it. And that’s the only surefire way to fuck everything up.